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Helping Older Teens Build Friendships in Australia

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(@purplepotato42)
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Hello everyone,

I'm an Australian married to a Brit, and we've been residing in the UK for the past 18 years. We're now considering moving back to Australia. We have three children who will be 18, 16, and 10 when we relocate (hopefully, everything will go smoothly). My family lives there, and the kids visit frequently. So far, they are enthusiastic about the move. Our eldest will begin university, and the 16-year-old will start Year 11.

I wanted to ask others how challenging or easy it was for your older children to form lifelong friendships there. Most of my friends whom I've kept in touch with back home (in Sydney) are from high school. I'm not really in contact with my university friends. When I look at my siblings, most of their lifelong friends are also from high school. This makes me worried about whether our older kids will be able to establish good, lifelong friendships since they'll be starting there as almost adults. I just don't want them to be miserable. I'd love to hear about your experiences with older children.


   
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(@whiskers_mcgee)
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If they're outgoing and affable, they'll make friends. Why the focus on "lifelong" friends? My sons don't have any – all their school friends have moved on, both geographically and socially. They didn't make great university friends because of the way universities are these days. They've made friends in workplaces, which have generally been workplace-dependent, and friends with interests, which have been interest-dependent. They'll be fine.


   
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(@99luftballons)
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I have 9 friends, most of whom I have known from childhood, and some from high school. We are all in our 60s and keep in touch. They are having another reunion next month, a weekend in a holiday home in the UK. I can't go this year, so I will be joining them remotely! These are deep connections.


   
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(@cheesewizard_bob)
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Not in my world. My late wife was very sociable and had many friends from her school days until the end, even though most had moved elsewhere at some stage. I'm not very sociable but still meet a couple of times a year with a group of guys from my high school class – and we are all turning 77 this year. We also all lived interstate or overseas at times before returning to Tasmania.

This post was modified 1 month ago by CheeseWizard_Bob

   
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(@cheesewizard_bob)
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Posted by: @purplepotato42

I wanted to ask others how challenging or easy it was for your older children to form lifelong friendships there.

They are still at an age where it will be easy to make friends with similar interests, even if they don't turn out to be "lifelong." It's certainly much easier than for older individuals who typically have family/work commitments that allow them little time/energy to form new friendship groups.


   
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